We have some PT 11's launched this Spring. These are the ones I have received pictures for.

Paul in Alaska faced a winter under more snow than I have ever seen... and spent his time, not in hibernation, but working on his PT11... and shoveling snow! p.schenk0 As the world thawed.. he brought his little boat outside. >>" ...it was nice to get the boat out of the garage, there is only so much curing a 70 degree shop can do compared to full on sunshine. ..... I am amazed at the level of detail you guys put into packing your kits. .... It made me smile! Thanks!"<<P.Schenk1 p.schenk2 p.schenk3BEAUTIFUL!

A PT 11 was launched in BC recently...  Christened 'Sea-Saw'..seasawtrailer2 seasaw2launchsea-sawOnDeck1seasawload4seasawload6 Seasaw1small>>"The PT11 is living up to all our expectations (and exceeding them in many ways). ..."<<  Congrats to David and Pam, ANOTHER BEAUTIFUL JOB! What a joy to see PT11s looking so great!  Check out this photo album of building Sea-Saw.

 

The PT Spear, one piece PT11 design is now official and kits available. This was such a Port Townsend moment; A dinghy launching with flowers and bubbly, great friends and even a blush causing speech in the drizzling rain. All that was missing were the bagpipes!

A Port Townsend dinghy launching
A Port Townsend dinghy launching
Christened 'RASCAL'
Christened 'RASCAL'

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happy owners
happy owners

PT SPear dinghy

checking it out alongside a friend's boat...
checking it out alongside a friend's boat...

Another SPEAR post HERE.

 

Sunday, March 24th was an overcast and cold day to be out on the water. Russell was not deterred. Paul Bieker's new design (the Riptide 41;"BLUE") was in the water and Russell was invited to check it out. "BLUE" is one of the most innovative racing sailboats around and sailed almost 23 knots on her very first sail.  { read more about it. }ptwatercraft.comBieker Boats design team of Paul Bieker and Eric Jolley are responsible for designing our PT Skiff, the 18.5ft fuel efficient motor skiff kit, sold by PT Watercraft. The PT Skiff, "Pika", built by J. Brandt in Seattle, was also there to compliment the gathering. ptwatercraft.comWhile on the dock at Shilshole Marina, a wedding party came down the dock and the bride and groom asked for a ride in the PT Skiff. Jan obliged and the smiling couple posed for photos. Russell snapped a few along side the wedding photographer. The PT Skiff has been put to work as a regatta chase boat, a marine research commuter, a phototgrapher's platform and now as a wedding prop!ptwatercraft.comSince we sold our PT Skiff, :( .., we have been using our experimental tornado cat motor boat for any over water commuting. The 'Grasshopper" (as we sometimes refer to it) has many many miles on her 15hp motor. The trip from Port Townsend to Seattle takes about 2 hours and generally uses about 2 gallons of fuel. This boat was designed on the back of an envelope and it is definitely a unique boat. No, there are no plans available.. :)ptwatercraft.comRussell was able to surf a cargo ship's wake for about 10 miles before the intensity of it got to him and he exited the wake. The trip from Port Townsend to Seattle and back, with favorable currents and surfing, used about 3 gallons of gas. This short video does little justice to the fun he was having.

 

THE SPEAR is identical in hull shape to the PT 11, but the interior geometry and construction are quite different and deserve explanation.  The PT 11 has a full width foredeck so that water drains into the aft compartment, otherwise there would be three areas that would need bailing of rain and spray. The Spear can have scuppers through the main bulkhead (the nesting PT 11 can’t) and therefore can have what I call a “trunk” seat.
When rowing with three, the trunk seat allows more comfortable seating for the person sitting in the bow. The areas to the sides of the seat are good for holding oars and other things in the boat.
The trunk seat also keeps the hull from twisting under sailing loads. It’s like a torsion box. (Shown below are the PT11, left, and the beta prototype of the Spear)
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Below photo taken in March 2013 of the prototype being built to figure out the process and to write the manual.

ptwatercraft.comTwo of the watertight hatch kits that we offer as options fit really well in this boat, making the boat versatile for carrying (and keeping dry) groceries, camping gear, cameras, safety gear, etc.
The aft hatch is easier to access when sailing and is great for things like cameras, jackets, and food, but because of the baffles under the back seat (more on that next), the volume of area under the forward hatch is much greater.
While the hatches are work to install, the cost of the kits is very small compared to the utility and safety they offer. They also provide access and visibility to the daggerboard trunk, mast socket, and rudder hardware, not to mention a good place to hide valuables left in the dinghy. Coast Guard regulations play a large role in the interior geometry of the PT 11 and the Spear. This may sound like big brother getting in the way of art, but it’s quite the opposite. The regulations are to protect us, the kit provider and especially you, the end user.
Buoyancy built into the right parts of the boat is necessary for safety. Sealed air voids (compartments) have the same value as flotation foam, but access ports or hatches are not allowed in sealed air voids. If the builder insists on inspection ports, it is then necessary to fill these voids completely with foam flotation in order to comply with safety standards. The Below Photo shows the boat before the deck and back seat lid are installed. ptwatercraft.comptwatercraft.comThe bow area (forward of the mast step bulkhead) is a sealed air void in the PT 11 and the Spear. The PT 11 has built in buoyancy tanks in the back of the boat on either side (outboard) that are equal to the volume in the bow. This is what the Coast Guard wants, and it makes sense.
The Spear has a large back seat area, but because it has a hatch, we have to install baffles to form sealed air voids outboard of the hatch where they would do the most good in an emergency. Though the baffles under the back seat decrease the usable volume for storage, they make us legal and make you safer, and they make for a well supported back seat. ptwatercraft.comBelow; Rowing the Spear with 2

ptwatercraft.comThe finished boat pictured was a beta prototype built summer 2012. Due to less specialty hardware required, the Spear base kit will cost several hundred dollars less that the nesting version. The boat will be lighter by 3 - 5 pounds. The various options, including sailing rig, offered for the PT11 nesting dinghy will be the same for the Spear. As of April 2013, we are taking orders for the "SPEAR" kit.

See our website for full information. PTW:)

Every time Russell has a boat to build, he seeks better ways of doing things. In this case, a simplified method for gluing the puzzle joints revealed itself. The manual for the PT 11 'Spear' has this section but earlier versions of the PT 11 nesting dinghy manuals have an earlier method. I have created a pdf file of the 7 page replacement for pages 7 through 14 in "Building the PT Eleven" for those who have an older version and have not yet begun to build their boat. This may also be interesting to anyone building a stitch and glue kit with puzzle joints. Click  HERE to download the .pdf file.  (533kb)ptwatercraft.com

The first PT 11 Nesting Dinghy kit has been cut as of April 15th and construction has just begun. The photo shows the plywood parts only and the finished prototype in the background.Kit Ply Parts

We have really been attempting to set up the pictures to the highest instructional advantage so actual building progress is happening is small steps. We will be updating the blog regularly with construction photos.

I know some of you must be wondering what is with the long silence and lack of images on Nesting Dinghy progress. What we have so far is a rough working prototype that will be the basis for the final prototype soon to begin. The good news is that this hull rows really well and has great initial stability in contrast to previous versions.  The connecting hardware prototypes look great and work great making assembly a matter of a few seconds. The nested package is more compact than before and it fits neatly in the back of our little Toyota truck. We are working through the sailing rig and oar/oarlock & foot brace arrangements.  Final design work will happen late Feb into March and then Russell has to crank out the new boat and manual. If I can manage to get some half way decent photos (weather and time permitting) I will post them soon.  This blog is finally waking up!  Cheers, Ashlyn

We now have the option with some nice drawings for making the PT Skiff self bailing. Follow this link to see it! http://ptwatercraft.com/ptwatercraft/PT_Skiff_self_bailing.html

One of several images to see on the website

Wow, what a weekend!  First and foremost, thank you all for coming and spending time talking to us about the PT Skiff. I hope all your questions got answered and you have had a chance to check out the website if you had not seen it before. The enthusiasm expressed by so many of you made the show a real pleasure for us. While I personally did not get many photos taken, J. Brandt and his wife, who built their PT Skiff earlier this year, not only brought their boat up from Seattle, and gave rides, they also took some great pictures. I am posting them below.

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We have the opportunity to run the PT Skiff from Port Townsend up into BC this week to trial it as a camp cruiser. We will be keeping notes and taking pictures which I will post when we get back by September 24th. After that we have reserved the CNC machine to start cutting kits for confirmed orders. Email us if you want your kit cut sooner than later. We will ship according to order received.  Thank you all again and for those of you who did not make it up to Port Townsend for this great festival, there is bound to soon be images and video up on the woodenboat.org website. Perhaps we will see you next year or sooner! Cheers for now, PTW

August 8, 2010 is now marked on the calender as the first PT Skiff rendezvous. PT Watercraft and "Pika" met in Puget Sound and compared boats and notes and each took turns at the wheel of the other. Paul Bieker and family happened to be Seattle bound on their boat which provided a great photo platform and we were able to get some video. The PT Skiff Rendezvous 2010
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Pictured here you will see the "Pika" powered with Evinrude's E-Tec 25hp. We are working on a fuel consumption study and comparison for the two boats to be published soon.

"Pika" has her driver's seat and grates held snug with velcro to great effect. Furthermore, the builder opted for a larger forward hatch. He also kept the side decks clear finished and the wood grain looks really nice next to her "20 feet of Bahama water"-blue hull paint.

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Of his return trip, the owner of PIKA wrote:

"Not sure if you guys noticed the large Hapag Loyd container coming down the sound as we split. He was running at 20 kn and I took his stern by about 100 yards and got on his east side a bit north of Point-no-Point. He had an awesome wake and I ended up surfing and carving sweet bottom turns for 5.5 miles until I had to bail out for Edmonds. Now, THAT is more fun than you are allowed to have in a powerboat! Truly the surfing was just brilliant. Everything came together perfectly, flat water, lot's of space, and a big ass container ship running at 20 kn in the right direction. Who knew the skiff would bottom turn like my 9'6" longboard, over, and over, and over again. I am still grinning!"

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