The Victoria Classic Boat Festival happens annually right before Port Townsend's Wooden Boat Festival. Many from our local fleet grace their docks in neighborly appreciation of these beautiful boats as we welcome their fleet in the days that follow.

This year, the PT 11 took the Best Tender award in Victoria, "without even trying!" according to owner John Bailey. John and Anne own the Schooner Sir Isaac that has an amazing story of its own. We feel honored that they chose the PT 11 as their tender.

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Port Townsend

SIR ISAAC

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2019 award
PT11 nested on the deck of Sir Isaac
PT11 nested on the deck of Sir Isaac

This is the second time the PT 11 has won this special award. In 2016, the very first SPEAR, Pato, tender to the classic double-ender, Vito Dumas, received the honor.

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SV Vito Dumas
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2016 award for the PT Spear

We thank our friends and builders of the PT 11 and PT Spear not only for choosing our designs but for building them so lovingly. Much of the attraction these dinghies garner once out and about in the world, is due to the craftsmanship put into them. We recognize that our kits ask a lot of every builder. It is a joy for us every time we learn that a builder has not only finished and gone sailing, but that they enjoyed the process and learned new skills.

Thank you. AEB 😉

 

 

 

Subject: “Oh, Puhleez...

Say it ain't so, Joe!
How disheartening to see a vendor of such nice craft from Port Townsend no less call a fender a "bumper."  This is such a lubberly mistake that it pains me to even draw attention to it.  It is akin to seeing a movie star pick her nose.  I sure wish I had never seen that!   But what is done is done and the best thing  you can do now is correct that horrible gaffe and we all shall agree to forever pretend it never happened. P.J. Nolan"

Russell and I do have a sense of humor and that email cracked me up! It is rare to receive such a harsh-and-gnarly critique that compliments at the same time. I must say, that takes some skill.

Fender or Bumper? I just had to find out. Searching online I found that vendors use the terms interchangeably for an assortment of barriers used on boats and docks. Could it be that we are all just movie stars picking our noses?

Since there is no reason to believe the internet, I turned to a more trusted source.

I actually still own a hard bound dictionary. It is 4” thick, weighs about 10 pounds, (it flattened my 6# postal scale) with gold lettering that proudly reads; The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. I had to haul it out, lug it to the table, and dust it off. Flipping through the musty pages, my handy-dandy magnifying glass was of considerable assistance.

FENDER; definition #5; A piece of timber, bundle of rope, or the like, hung over the side of a vessel to lessen shock or prevent chafing..."

Most commonly called 'fenders'.
Most commonly called 'fenders'.

Hmmm, that sounds about like what I was thinking except I picture the inflatable kind found at a marine chandlery.

 

 

 

Bumper: definition #3; Any protective rim, guard, pad, or disk for absorbing shock and preventing damage from bumping."

The PT 11 glue-on, "bumper", EPDM extrusion.
The PT 11 glue-on, "bumper", EPDM extrusion.

Now that sounds about like what we have permanently attached to the outer edges of the gunwales on our dinghies.

For argument’s sake, one could say that they both serve a very similar purpose and regardless of their possible origins, for better or worse, language evolves.

In truth, the most accurate term for what we have is neither fender nor bumper, but, rubber rubbing strip or for an internet search; "rub-rail".  At least, for now, I can relax and not feel embarrassed.
However; I do take issue with the term, “lubberly”. I had to look that up too, just to be sure that I was properly insulted, at least for Russell's sake if not my own.

lubberly - clumsy and unskilled;  "unskilled labor"; "unskilled workmanship", inexperienced in seamanship...

Hardly the case, my dear fellow. That would be a “horrible gaffe” on your part. But, as I am a friendly sort and would not want to disrespect anyone’s preferences or “pain” someone with my own, I heartily agree, “to forever pretend it never happened.”

Thank you for the challenge. It was fun. 😉 AE Brown

Our local heroine, again!

For the second year in a row, Russell and I have had our minds blown as summer boating gets going. The Seventy/48 human-powered race from Tacoma to Port Townsend was a mere curiosity to us when first announced in 2017. We thought, ‘cool!”; another great brainchild of Jake Beatty and Daniel Evans of the NW Maritime Center. Then Inger walked into our shop.
Inger Rankins of NW Sails & Canvas, is a highly skilled canvas master, creating boat covers and dodgers that are jaw-droppingly beautiful and perfect. She is a fit Norwegian-born 50 something that can be seen walking or biking all over Port Townsend with her trusty and adorable, canine side-kick, Rupert. Inger is also a close friend. I admire and appreciate her on so many levels. So when she asked Russell if she could borrow our PT 11 nesting dinghy to row seventy miles up Puget Sound in a race?... First, Russell tried to talk her out of it. Then, he took her seriously, albeit in bewilderment.
During the 2018 inaugural Seventy/48, Russell nearly pulled his hair out in elated disbelief when he realized that Inger was going to finish in the top 30% of over 115 long and sleek human powered craft, in an 11 ft, fixed seat, rowboat; our rowboat. She became and instant local heroine and for us, the star of the year.
As the 2019 race approached, she was struggling to find training time. She rowed to and from the sail loft where she was working with husband and sailmaker, Sean Rankins. The distance from Point Hudson to the NW School of Wooden Boat Building is roughly 6 nautical miles each way and weather and current present many challenges. But injury can also stump training efforts and she hurt her back at work. Inger doggedly kept training when she could, and was smart to get well rested before the start date.
A lot had been learned from 2018’s race and Russell sent her off with a lighter boat, lighter oars and encouragement to quit the race at any time. Everyone knew she had already done the impossible, a feat difficult to beat and potentially dangerous to try. Stubborn as she is, she tried, and she succeeded! In conditions rougher than in 2018, Team Valhalla beat her own 2018 time by a solid 45 minutes. She finished 30th out of 108 boats. A collection of friends, fans, and Norwegian flags greeted her at 2:13 in the afternoon as she rang her finishing bell. The first aid crew went down a list of questions about how she was feeling and checked her off as fit to row to the beach. I listened with wonder and searched her face for signs of trouble. She was instead, grinning after over 19 hours of rowing non-stop.
Yep, heroic in every way.
Will she do it again in 2020? There is a good chance she will. She told me how she had felt mentally fresher this year and that her body liked rowing. She said she cannot describe how happy she feels when she is out there on the water. I think to myself, ‘amazing’. She’d been told that the Platte Canyon High School Team PCHS had watched her 2018 post race videos for tips and inspiration, and being able to inspire others, has been a real bonus for her.
Russell and I want to publicly thank Inger for her tenacity and the pure joy she has given us by doing this race in our boat. It is a priceless gift we will always treasure.  Some photos follow.
Videos from 2018: An interview with Inger Rankins  Overboard practice before the 2018 race. And look for a really well done video about Inger on the Off Center Harbor website.

Valhalla fans await Inger Rankins in the Seventy48 2019: ptwatercraft.com
Valhalla fans await Inger Rankins in the Seventy48 2019
Team Valhalla arrives just after 2PM in the Seventy 48 2019 race: ptwatercraft.com
Valhalla arrives just after 2PM
Team Valhalla as 30th:ptwatercraft.com
Arrival times for the 2019 Seventy 48 race showing Team Valhalla as 30th.
PT 11 dinghy after a 70 mile race.
Pulling into the beach after 19 hours.
Inger Rankins basking in joy.
Inger takes a seat and answers questions.
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Inger stretches out on the beach with Rupert looking like he'd been the one to row 70 miles.
Homemade trophy; ptwatercraft.com
Port Townsend friends created this awesome trophy for Inger.
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Our friend Nate Rooks arrives.
Team no dream #11
Nate Rooks of Team No Dream (one of the early finishers) showing painful hands. Nate finished 11th by 9:15am. (70 miles in 14 hours)
ptwatercraft.com Team No Dream and a beer.
Nate Rooks of Team No Dream cooling off with a beer at the finish.
70-48 resting time for Team No Dream
Nate finally gets to snooze under his boat.

Retail businesses in WA will have received this recent notice from our Department of Revenue:

Starting July 1, 2019, retailers can no longer make tax exempt sales to nonresidents based on their residence (i.e. Alaska, Oregon, Montana). Instead, consumers residing in qualifying states, US territories or provinces of Canada may request a refund of state sales tax paid from the Department once a year. Please see our Special Notice for more information. https://dor.wa.gov/find-taxes-rates/retail-sales-tax/sales-nonresidents

I can only assume they are trying to accumulate less paperwork by asking eligible customers to keep track and submit only once a year. Thank you for your understanding. AEB 😉

 

This year, 2019, the first leg of the Race to Alaska started on June 3rd in the face of a near gale. It was an exciting run to Victoria for those of us who had boats capable of handling the conditions. Team PT Watercraft in the G-32 did really well in spite of the bobbing and diving and water over deck. We were going fast, averaging 9 knots in waves stirred to peaks by strong wind against current. The GPS indicated from 8 knots up to 15 when the water flattened out a bit near Victoria.

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Race start 2019 R2AK, Russell

We had a fun team with Alex Spear and myself joining Russell; me doing my darndest to hold the camera steady and all of us well braced to keep from flying to leeward at times. We kept within sight of the far more powerful, lead boat, Pear Shaped Racing, finishing some 20 minutes behind them. We just shake our heads in awe at the capability of this weird little boat designed by Jan Gougeon.

Ours was a 4 hour run having traveled more than the official 35 mile distance. .. all racers had to tack around the "no-go" zone. In Victoria, we hung out with some of the racers and support folks. Two boats sustained damage that made use of Russell's epoxy skills and it felt good to be useful instead of stressing about his own continuation of the race. We opted instead, to take a little cruise and that is another post. 😉

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We had cruising gear, dinghy, and motor brought over by car on the Ferry so we could load up for our cruise north... so much 'stuff!

For now, here is a silly video of our first leg from this year. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFO0sXEYek4

In the description is a link to more photos of the start by Sean Trew. Definitely worth a visit.

Happy Summer boating!

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Dinghy loaded with gear ..motor, bedding, cooler...+++ We had to unload the truck from the parking lot and row to the marina.

Team PTWATERCRAFT aboard INCOGNITO is racing Monday morning June 3rd in the R2AK. We will be racing as far as Victoria and then taking off on a short cruise, hoping to see come of the lead boats along the way North. We will check emails a couple of times to be sure but if you don't get a prompt response, this is why! We thank our customers and, with great appreciation, are collecting deposits over the Summer for the next run of kits!

Please do email your questions. We will get back to you.

Safe boating to all! AEB 😉

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Team PTWATERCRAFT's totally cool Gougeon 32, INCOGNITO holds the R2AK solo record for 2 years straight.

Sponsored by our favorite epoxy;ptwatercraft.com

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the first hour

 

 

 

"I'm a tracker junkie and I'm okaaaay...." singing as I stay tuned to the Seventy 48 tracker. At 6:30am, Team Valhalla in the PT11 nesting dingy is still going 3.2- 3.5 knots after nearly 12 hours non-stop!  She has kept up with the some of the paddle boarders, including Skelty, our friend Tim Nolan who appears to be pushing through non-stop as well! If you know Tim you are duly impressed.

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Loading the boat up in front of the Swan Hotel and Schooner Martha Foundation at Point Hudson
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As of 7:15 AM June 1st, 2019

We will be cheering Inger on as she comes in down at the city dock in Port Townsend!

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Rupert
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An eery scene as this ship emerges from the fog just off Point Hudson.

PT 11 owners and builders may find these updates valuable. We have made PDF's for easy download and in color!

While we are much happier with the new gasket installation method, the hull gasket is still vulnerable to being yanked out of its notch at the lower corners. Why is this? Because surgical tubing is difficult to adhere to and its also very “grabby”, meaning, hard friction when assembling the boat or otherwise, can pull the gasket out of its notch.  Flushing with fresh water and re gluing is quite easy but we’d really like to test using neoprene for the hull gasket. Neoprene doesn’t have perfect memory but we think it would work fine for the hull gasket; it’s not grabby and it glues well.
For anyone who wants to try the neoprene hull gasket, we will send you 5ft of the stuff in exchange for a full report of its performance. New method for installing or replacing gaskets. PDF ptwatercraft.com

The surgical tubing is still our preference for the hatch and dagger board trunk gaskets.ptwatercraft.com

Installing a handle and bailer for the aft section of the PT 11. PDFptwatercraft.com

Finishing details from Page 290 in the new manual starting with the foot braces section.PDF

The above PDF includes the previous two 'PDF's along with other details from the end portion of the new manual starting at the foot braces section.

Another update we recently posted concerns a tight fit on some dagger boards due to over thick trunk log plywood.  If your dagger board is too tight, see the fix HERE.

😉 AEB

We have had a few complaints about dagger boards not fitting in their trunks, but we knew that we had designed in plenty of tolerance, right? We figured that it was sloppy epoxy work or wear strips that weren’t glued down tight. Imagine our surprise when the board didn’t fit into the trunk in our new boat!
What is causing this? Well, to start with, the board is binding at the fore & aft edges, where we thought we had enough clearance. Are the new boards longer in the fore & aft dimension? It doesn’t appear so.

Please see this printable PDF for the fix.

The solution to this problem for existing builders will vary depending on whether the trunk and foils have been built already, or one but not the other have been built.

We apologize for difficulties caused by our screw-up. We will ship out replacement trunk logs for anyone that hasn’t built the trunk yet and we will trim a bit from the aft edge (and re-round) any dagger boards shipped for existing boats.
Please keep in touch if you have any similar issues. We could have found and corrected this much sooner had we known that it was a fore & aft clearance issue. We care about this stuff a lot, so if you find a real issue, let us know.

The new PT 11 manuals are ready. Who needs one?

A very short update about gluing the bumper: We now advise not to use Tolulene to prep your bumper for gluing. It appears to be totally unnecessary. Just sand thoroughly and wipe clean before gluing as described in the manual.

Ashlyn & Russell